Day 22: Thankful for Art Teachers

Day 22: Thankful for Art Teachers

“Day 22…” is not the usual way I would start a blog post, but this month I have been trying to share daily gratitude through social media. Today, I wanted to go a little further in an attempt to express just a fraction of my gratitude toward the art educators I work with day in and day out.

FCPS Art Teachers at the National Portrait Gallery

I have said, many times, that in my job I have “the great pleasure of working with 380 amazing art teachers.” It’s not just talk. I mean it. I am  frequently over-credited as “being in charge of” or “running the entire” K-12 art program in our school district, but in fact it is these folks who make it all happen. While I do my best to develop and provide helpful resources and facilitate some fidelity in the programs, the amount of work we are able to do in the fine arts office is dwarfed next to the work this army of art teachers do every day.

I don’t just mean this in a numbers sense. Sure, 380 art teachers can put in way more hours than a couple of us in the instructional services office, but these teachers are committed! Every day I see or hear about another way they are going well above and beyond to make a difference in their students lives. They are supporting students through difficult situations, life coaching, staying late to support clubs and activities, taking student to museums, traveling with them to New York City, meeting them for evening artmaking events… The list goes on, and many of them are practicing artists to boot!

I want to share one specific story that I hope will be illustrative.

Recently a new central office project manager was named for the STEAM program (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics). The team has existed for a few years now, and turns regularly — as they should — to specialists in the Science, Math, Fine Arts, Career and Technical Education, and Instructional Technology offices to support and inform their work. I admit, though, that from its inception, I have struggled with how I can support from my role.

Naturally, the new project manager, getting acquainted with her new role, wanted to meet with me to discuss how we might work together and I am certain that I sounded a bit lost as to how I can support in a meaningful way. I didn’t want to give the impression that the Arts didn’t have a place in this work — and I definitely didn’t want the ‘A’ in STEAM to be what some have called the POS approach (paint on stuff), but I couldn’t yet grasp how I might help.

Not long after, the STEAM team asked for input to identify schools where they could see STEAM instruction in practice in our schools. Now that I can help with! And this starts to get at my point… Even as I am unsure of my role in supporting STEAM as an initiative, I know that there are many art teachers who are deeply engaged in the work in their schools.

I was able to recommend several teachers and schools where this is happening through the arts, and as the STEAM team has started making school visits, they have been duly impressed by the work of the art teachers.

And that is what I mean. The magic is happening on the ground, in the schools, and the magicians are the art teachers.

I am so grateful for each of you!

 

 

 

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VAEA – Northern Region

Having the annual VAEA conference in Northern Virginia this year really shows in the large turn out for the Northern Region Meeting. 


I am so excited to have so many of my local colleagues here, and especially excited that they were all here to recognize Susan Silva who received the secondary educator of the year award for the Northern Region. 

Thank you, Andrew, for putting her name forward. She is so deserving!

Congratulations Susan!

A New Teacher Reflects

I was moved by the reflection this new teacher shared on social media, and I am sharing it here with his permission…

As I wrap up my second MONTH of teaching, I’ve come to realize a bunch cliches about teaching are dead on accurate. Starting off with: 

There are good days and bad days.

The same class that is amazing one week could very easily be the worst the next. It’s very annoying and honestly kind of sad when you see great students fall for the traps of the students that are challenging. They fall like dominos. Because quite frankly, it’s fun as hell being the class clown/being a rebel. 

There are days you want to be the best teacher in the world and there are days you want to quit.

Ask me on a Wednesday, when I have my favorite line up of classes and I’ll say I want to stay in elementary art forever. But ask me on a Tuesday after first period and I’ll want to put in my two weeks and leave. But when I’m walking down the hall to make copies and passing by one of my 1st grade classes and having a chorus of “omg Mr. Reinaltt!” Or “that’s our awesome art teacher!,” which leads to each student running out of their line to give you a hug, I literally can’t handle my happiness. When moments like this happen, it makes me want to stay in elementary school for the rest of my teaching years. 

Being a male teacher is going to make a huge difference.

There might be 1 or 2 male classroom teachers and 4 specialists in the entire school. I can’t tell you the amount of times I’ve been called “Mrs. Reinaltt” or when I tell them I’m not married “Miss Reinaltt”. I had a class of boys bully a kid for coloring his shirt pink for his self portrait. So the next week, I wore pink (also because on Wednesday’s we wear pink, duh) and dared those same students to bully me. They didn’t, and now they know there are NO such things as boy or girl colors. 

Being a male teacher AND a minority is going to make a huge difference.

Especially in this politically climate, at my school that is 77% minority (but it seems so much higher) so many students feel unsafe and unfortunately scared to be themselves. I stress in every single class to be proud of who they are. I tell them the world needs us to be the difference. To not allow the world to tell us (mainly them) where we belong or what we should do with our lives. 

Two months of teaching, feels like 2 years. There are many challenges ahead, but my heart and my mind are in this for the long haul.

Thank you, Arthur, for sharing your experience with all of us.

Show me the Mona Lisa

I have always enjoyed seeing the variety of classroom strategies used in art classrooms. I am having just as much fun sharing them!


I love this simple, “artsy” way of making expectations clear. 

Not making expectations clear and explicit is a common mistake among those struggling with classroom management. It’s not enough to say “behave.” We have to explain to our students exactly what we want them to do! In this case, we can show them!

Thanks to Marissa and Linda for sharing this idea from their classroom. 

A Simple Reward System

Here’s another quick strategy I saw used with great effect recently… Do you know what that glowing purple object is on the table?


It’s a Bluetooth speaker!

The teacher has a playlist on her own phone and places the speaker, at a low volume, on tables that are showing that everyone is on task. The students really enjoyed having the reward of listening to music while they worked, even if the speaker had to move to another table after a few minutes. 

Thanks again to Bethany for sharing this idea!

Easy Access

What is this wardrobe rack doing in the art room?


I’m visiting Lois today who credits Laura Watson with this ingenious approach to storing visual resources. 

Some posters are mounted directly on wire hangers to display from hooks at the front of the room. 


Other hangers hold large plastic folders that hold collections of visuals organized by subject and medium. 


This vertical organization allows Lois to grab something quickly, even in the middle of a class, and post it on the board with clips. 


What a great idea! 

Thanks to Lois and Laura for sharing.

Bridging the gap between Art and Education