Category Archives: supervision & leadership

Expectations

I have had the privilege of attending our local leadership conferences for years and have always felt that it was a shame that all teachers in the division couldn’t be there to hear the message that would drive so many decisions in the coming year. That feeling is compounded when we have a new superintendent. It may not compare, but I hope some of you can appreciate those messages shared here through my mental filter. 

Photo borrowed from @ehmukai on Twitter

Dr. Brabrand shared his expectations of all of us. Not just the leaders in the audience, but every last employee of the school system. His expectations are:

  1. Love kids
  2. Love teaching
  3. Be professional 

LOVE KIDS

Even those employees who don’t work with kids must love kids. Kids are why we are here. 

LOVE TEACHING

I especially appreciate that he clarified that this means loving learning as well. Teachers must love and seek out opportunities to learn more about teaching to continually improve their craft. 

BE PROFESSIONAL

Dr. B has a high standard for professionalism. He will hold us to that standard, and he expects us to hold him to that standard as well. We are role models for kids!

Check out the first Leadership Conference post for more. 

Art and Our New Superintendent

A Leadership Conference marks the beginning of each new school year for the school and central office administrators in our school system. This year’s conference was our first real opportunity to hear from our new superintendent, Dr. Scott Brabrand

https://www.fcps.edu/news/fairfax-county-school-board-confirms-scott-brabrand-fcps-superintendent
One of the prominent ideas he spoke about was mindset, which he illustrated with a personal art example. Dr. Brabrand shared his efforts to challenge his own mindset regarding his drawing ability. Any artist or art teacher has probably had to listen politely to hundreds of people explaining that they can’t draw. (Read a related post HERE.) Dr. Brabrand recognized his own mindset on his ability and set out to challenge it. 

First, he spent 15 minutes drawing a cat, with unimpressive results. Then he asked an art teacher to help him for one hour, and drew another cat. This time, the results were quite impressive. With only an hour of instruction, he was able to grow from a child-like line drawing, to a well-defined, natural form of a cat including value, shading, and texture. Well done, sir!

So what’s the point?! 

As educators we must consider our own mindset around teaching and learning. That means we must, first, recognize our mindset, and second, be willing to challenge and change that mindset. We cannot expect to be successful, as educators, if we don’t believe in the human ability to learn. And we won’t meet our mandate to reach every child if we have anything less than this growth mindset for each and everyone of our students. 

If you’re interested in reading more about mindset, check out these posts:

Thankful for What We Have

I don’t usually talk directly about where I work, but today I am feeling particularly proud to be part of the Fairfax County Public Schools art program. I have been communicating with an art teacher who left our school system a while back to live in another part of the country. She is excited to finally have a Fine Arts Supervisor in her division and has been talking with this supervisor about some of the wonderful things we have been doing here in FCPS.

She wrote:

Our new fine arts coordinator shared several goals she has for the future of our program. They all aligned with what FCPS is doing or has done. She was thrilled to hear more about my FCPS Fine Arts experience.

This supervisor is especially interested in supporting new teachers, and would like to emulate some of the resources we provide to our new teachers and the way we share resources to all art teachers through our blackboard organization. Nothing of that kind currently exists in that school system.

Another common interest was found in an art teacher exhibition. Many of you have read about our annual Artist Teacher Exhibitions through this blog.

Another big change for this year is a Art Teacher Exhibition, which she was unsure if/how it would work but wanted to give it a shot. I told her I know that it would work because I have seen it and showed her an article and youtube video of your last FCPS Exhibit that solidified her vision.

While it’s wonderful to think of all of these supports and programs being emulated, it was especially good to hear her views on our curriculum.

She also noted that all FCPS curriculum and lessons I use and have shared with her are very rigorous and I shared that it is easy to teach with rigor and many moving parts when you aren’t creating every single piece on your own. The resources, training and support make all the difference.

She repeatedly told me that she couldn’t wait to meet “these amazing people” and is curious to learn how they built this program and all of these resources… I am inspired by her hopes and vision for our program.

Wow.

Working within a system like FCPS can make you hyper-aware of its challenges and shortcomings, but notes like the ones from this teacher are a great reminder of how good we have it. Despite any criticism we may have or hear, FCPS is still providing a world-class art education for its students, and other school systems are trying to get to where we are. I’m proud to be a part of it!

What is your purpose here?

I hope when you read, “What is your purpose here?” You can fully envision the scene from Pirates of the Caribbean, Dead Man’s Chest. If not I think the image, below, is linked to a gif. (Hit me with a comment if you know the response to the question from the movie.)

I suppose it’s fair if you are wondering what this has to do with art education…

I met with art collaborative team leads recently and posed a question about the purpose of art CTs. Some quick answers included “to collaborate,” “to share ideas,” and “to share best practices.”  Yes, these are reasons we get together, but why do we do these things? Why do we collaborate? Why do we share ideas?

TO IMPROVE STUDENT LEARNING!

I am surrounded by this language all the time in the instructional services department. If a similar question were asked of a group of my central office colleagues we would probably all respond in unison. 

This interaction with my art instructional leaders helped me realize that this is a message that I should work harder to promote. It’s a mindset that can impact how we interact with our work. Everything we do should be with the goal of improving student learning. 

Support for Arts Integration 

“As the only school system with its own arts integration office” Prince George’s County Public Schools presented their progress and successes in bringing arts integration to all of its 208 schools. 


This is work in progress, but student engagement and test scores are improving — and the work is continuing. One reason for its success is the degree of support this effort is receiving. Evidence of the support is here in the room. Elizabeth Stuart, the visual art supervisor, is joined by division leaders including Amy Rosenkrans, Executive Coordinator for Arts Integration, John Ceschini, Arts Integration Officer, and their Chief Executive Officer (superintendent) Dr. Kevin Maxwell. 

You read that right! The superintendent from a large Maryland school district came to NYC to help present this work to art educators. 

Advice to an Arts Supervisor

I met with a friend and colleague for lunch today to chat about his new role as a fine arts supervisor in a nearby school district. I didn’t go in with a specific list of advice to give, but after some reflection, here are a few things I hope he will take away.

Moving On Up by Charles Raubacher, art teacher
Moving On Up by Charles Raubacher, art teacher

Continue reading Advice to an Arts Supervisor