Tag Archives: classroom

Table Settings

I am so fortunate to be able to see a variety of approaches to managing materials and art room routines. Among these are the ways teachers mark and organize their tables.

Here’s a nice little table setting that includes a caddy for frequently used materials, a small table trash bin, and a card stand that allows the teacher to rotate jobs from table to table. I am particularly fond of this particular job. We need students to be role models in every class!

Thanks to Sarah for sharing!

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What’s Happening in Art?

Most elementary students come to art just once a week. It’s not always easy for them to remember what is going on in art, but it is so easy — and so effective — to post what is happening in the art room for each grade level. This short video shows an example that includes conceptual themes, learning outcomes, artmaking challenges and exemplars for each grade.

Thanks to Toni and Elizabeth!

Show me the Mona Lisa

I have always enjoyed seeing the variety of classroom strategies used in art classrooms. I am having just as much fun sharing them!


I love this simple, “artsy” way of making expectations clear. 

Not making expectations clear and explicit is a common mistake among those struggling with classroom management. It’s not enough to say “behave.” We have to explain to our students exactly what we want them to do! In this case, we can show them!

Thanks to Marissa and Linda for sharing this idea from their classroom. 

A Simple Reward System

Here’s another quick strategy I saw used with great effect recently… Do you know what that glowing purple object is on the table?


It’s a Bluetooth speaker!

The teacher has a playlist on her own phone and places the speaker, at a low volume, on tables that are showing that everyone is on task. The students really enjoyed having the reward of listening to music while they worked, even if the speaker had to move to another table after a few minutes. 

Thanks again to Bethany for sharing this idea!

Easy Access

What is this wardrobe rack doing in the art room?


I’m visiting Lois today who credits Laura Watson with this ingenious approach to storing visual resources. 

Some posters are mounted directly on wire hangers to display from hooks at the front of the room. 


Other hangers hold large plastic folders that hold collections of visuals organized by subject and medium. 


This vertical organization allows Lois to grab something quickly, even in the middle of a class, and post it on the board with clips. 


What a great idea! 

Thanks to Lois and Laura for sharing.

What does your art room say?

I am lucky to be able to visit many art classrooms. As I travel around to our different schools, few things are more obvious than the  way the art rooms are set up and the message they send to our students.

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Without a conversation, I can walk into a classroom and begin to know what is important to that teacher. (On occasion I walk into a classroom and begin to understand what was important to the teacher who retired ten years ago.) The physical space we create (or fail to create) communicates a huge amount of information, intentional or not, to our students and can have a significant impact on the way the students feel about being there. If you are thinking, “that could impact enrollment,” you are absolutely right!

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If you haven’t thought too much about the FEEL of your classroom, you should! I could share many great examples, but today I will share images from just one teachers space.

A welcoming doorway, rugs and playful ligthing do so much to make this an inviting space where kids love to be. It doesn’t hurt any that there is enough extra space in the adjacent storage room that it could be converted into a student lounge where students are welcome to gather for lunch, or sit in a comfy old couch before or after school.

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Think about your space and how you can make it more inviting! In a future post we will get a little deeper into what your classroom says about what students learn. Stay tuned, and I look forward to sharing more of our awesome art rooms.